Mugabe’s Rantings


President Robert Mugabe vowed on Tuesday to keep up the push for majority shares in foreign-owned firms to transfer to locals, declaring that Zimbabwe had nothing to lose.

Mugabe, 88, also accused the United States of seeking to sabotage Zimbabwe’s economy by imposing sanctions on Mbada Holdings and Marange Resources – two diamond firms part-owned by the government.

Speaking at an annual children’s party in Harare held on the eve of the country’s independence, Mugabe said the United States had threatened sanctions on anyone buying diamonds from Zimbabwe.

A week after he was rumoured dead, Mugabe vowed to defy external pressure aimed at forcing a change of government in Zimbabwe, declaring: “Some of us died a long time ago. We don’t give in.”

He said Zimbabwe will forge ahead with its indigenisation programme which has caused consternation within a coalition he formed with his MDC rivals in 2009.

In a reference to mines, Mugabe said foreign individuals had arrived in the country with not so much of an investment than “hoes and shovels”, which was the basis on which they were laying claim to the country’s mineral wealth.

“That’s what we are objecting to,” Mugabe said. “Down with them! Let them take their hoes and shovels and leave. Do they think God was crazy to put these mineral resources in our hands?”

Mugabe, who championed controversial land reforms targeting white farmers starting in 2000, hinted he was running out of time and the resource ownership drive was the final battleground for the liberation effort which began with a bush war against colonial rule in the 1970s.

“We are living in the afternoon, if not in the evening of our lives and those who are still in the morning of their lives will have the benefits we are fighting for,” he told thousands of children drawn from the country’s 10 provinces who gathered at the City Sports Centre, among them his two sons Robert Jnr and Chatunga.

He added: “They don’t have to toil as we have done. It would be much easier for them to proceed into the future.”

Zimbabwe celebrates its 32nd independence on Wednesday which is being held under the theme: ‘Indigenisation and Economic Empowerment for Economic Transformation’.

Prime Minister Morgan Tsvangirai told journalists in Harare on Tuesday that he had disagreed with Mugabe at their last cabinet meeting when Zanu PF ministers proposed an empowerment-based theme.


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Tsvangirai said he had wanted a theme about peace.
“I wish to state that we had a discussion in Cabinet last week about the proposed theme for this year,” Tsvangirai said.

“We rejected it because we find this a repugnant theme, which sounds more of a slogan for a political party than an inclusive, peace-building theme, which should be determined through consensus.

“While we support broad-based empowerment of the ordinary person, our colleagues have taken indigenisation to mean expropriation and nationalisation. We have disagreed in this government because there are others who want to perpetuate the old culture of expropriation, looting and self-aggrandizement clad in new and misleading nomenclature such as indigenisation.”

(Source)

Zimbabwean President Robert Mugabe on Monday brandished Nato a ‘terrorist’ organisation over attacks in Libya, saying the military alliance wanted to kill veteran leader Muammar Gaddafi.

“So you get mad people in Europe. Mad people who refuse and reject the truth, mad people who defy international law,” Mugabe told a gathering to remember fighters of the country’s liberation struggle.

“Look at what they are doing in Libya, it is Nato against international law.

“That’s why I say Nato is now a terrorist organisation as well. If it defies international law.”

Mugabe, who has governed Zimbabwe since independence in 1980, accused Western nations of wishing to kill Gaddafi.

“It [Nato] has lost it’s legitimacy, it has become terrorist and beware this they can do on any other African country than Libya. We must always be in a state of preparedness,” Mugabe said.

“They seek to kill Gaddafi. They have in fact deliberately killed some of his children.

“Now when they do that deliberately, it is exactly what the Taliban and al-Qaeda do – what is the difference in terms of what they [Nato] are doing?”

Elections

The Western coalition behind the bombings of Gaddafi’s military assets, co-ordinated by Nato and mostly waged by France and Britain, launched its campaign under a UN mandate to protect civilians from a violent government crackdown.

The 87-year-old Mugabe also slammed former colonial ruler Britain for imposing sanctions on him and his close allies in government, and said Zimbabwe will “hit back” at over 400 British companies operating in the country.

“We cannot continue to receive the battering of sanctions without hitting back,” Mugabe said.

“Why should a company that belongs to Britain be allowed to continue to mine our gold in this country?”

Mugabe, who formed a power sharing government with his former rival Prime Minister Morgan Tsvangirai in 2009, reiterated the country must hold elections after the finalisation of a constitution-making process.

Under Zimbabwe’s unity accord, signed after violent and inconclusive presidential elections in 2008, a new constitution must be approved by referendum before new general elections.

The constitution-writing process is running a year behind schedule.

(Source)

Zimbabwe President Robert Mugabe on Thursday condemned gay “filth” in Europe, as he lambasted Western powers for maintaining their asset freeze and travel ban on him and his inner circle.

“We don’t worry ourselves about the goings-on in Europe,” he told thousands at the burial of deputy intelligence chief Menard Muzariri, who died on Monday.

“About the unnatural things happening there, where they turn man-to-man and woman-to-woman. We say, well, it’s their country. If they want to call their country British Gaydom, it’s up to them. That’s not our culture. We condemn that filth.

“We get alarmed when these countries have the audacity to schedule us as an item to discuss in their parliament.”

Homosexuality is illegal in the southern African country. While the Gays and Lesbians of Zimbabwe (Galz) association is allowed to operate, it suffers police harassment.

“We must unite in opposing and condemning the sanctions,” he said.

“We must demonstrate that we are ready to defend our country and sacrifice our lives. The enemy will try by all means to destroy us, but if we are united, we are strong.”

Mugabe and members of his inner circle were slapped with EU and US sanctions in 2002 following disputed presidential elections.

His call for unity comes in the wake of widening cracks in the power-sharing deal with Prime Morgan Tsvangirai, a political rival.

Zimbabwe is drafting a new constitution to pave the way for new elections, following disputed 2008 polls that led to the unity government, but the process was often marred by violence.

Last month, Tsvangirai threatened to pull out of the unity government following the arrest of his energy minister, Elton Mangoma.

(Source)